YOU CAN’T JUST GET IN AND GO

This subject is about how to plan a safe journey. It is about how much weight you can carry and how to load it, how much fuel you should carry and how much runway you need. How long will it take to get to your destination and how to re-plan on route if necessary. It is also about reading, understanding and then using the information you get from charts in order to plan a safe route.

THERE ARE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW

Like the navigation exam, this is a subject that is made easier the better you understand the maths and some of the physics. Some is intuitive; the consequence of an overloaded aircraft is obvious, but what about an aircraft with a forward or aft C of G? How will this effect the take off and landing performance, stall speeds, fuel consumption, glide speed etc

RESULT IS SAFETY

The exam is 20 questions in 75 minutes

The original definition of a meter was a ten-millionth of the length of a quarter meridian from the equator to the true North Pole. This was derived by the French in the late seventeen hundreds, and was accurate to within 0.02 millimetres. But now the modern definition of a meter is the distance travelled by an electromagnetic wave through a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 seconds. This level of accuracy is required for your GPS to work, and is an inconceivably short period of time for an instrument to measure, yet you rely on it for navigation. Learn about the aircraft and the system you use to operate it,. and your decisions will come from an intellectual depth of knowledge. That can only be a good thing where safety is paramount.